Tag Archives: NAT

Pings featured image

Advanced Ping: httping, dnsping, smtpping

I really love ping! It is easy to use and directly reveals whether the network works or not. Refer to Why Ping is no Security Flaw! (But your Friend) and Advanced Tracerouting. At least outgoing pings (from trust to untrust) should be allowed without any security concerns. However, many companies are denying these ICMP echo-requests from untrust into the DMZ which makes it difficult to test whether all servers are up and running.

I was sitting at the customer’s site replacing the DMZ firewall. Of course I wanted to know (from the outside) whether all servers are connected correctly (NAT) and whether the firewall permits the connections (policy). However, ping was not allowed. Therefore I used several layer 7 ping tools that generate HTTP, DNS, or SMTP sessions (instead of ICMP echo-requests) and revealed whether the services (and not only the servers) were running. Great!

This post shows the installation and usage of httping, dnsping, and smtpping on a Linux machine, in my case a Ubuntu server 14.04.4 LTS, as well as some Wireshark screenshots from captured sessions.

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FortiGate VIP SNAT featured image

FortiGate Virtual IPs without Reference

Migrating from Juniper ScreenOS firewalls to FortiGates, there are some differences to note with static NATs, i.e., Mapped IPs (MIPs) on a Netscreen and Virtual IPs (VIPs) on a FortiGate. While the Juniper MIPs on an interface are always used by the firewall whenever a packet traverses the interface, the virtual IP objects on a FortiGate must be used at least once in the security policy before they are really used by the firewall.

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FortiGate VIP with Interface featured image

FortiGate Virtual IPs with Interface “Any”

On the FortiGate firewall, address objects and virtual IPs (VIPs) can be set up with an interface. For address objects this has no technical relevance – the address objects simply only appear on policies if the appropriate interface is selected. But for virtual IPs, this setting has relevance on how connections are NATed. This can be problematic.

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Cisco ASA PBR - featured image

Policy Based Routing on a Cisco ASA

Cisco ASA 9.4 (and later) is now supporting Policy Based Routing. Yeah. Great news, since many customers are requesting something like “HTTP traffic to the left – VoIP traffic to the right”. Coming with a new Cisco ASA 5506-X I was happy to try the policy based routing feature.

The configuration steps through the ASDM GUI are not easy and full of errors, so I try to give some hints within this blog post.

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Palo Alto PBF w different VRs featured image

Policy Based Forwarding on a Palo Alto with different Virtual Routers

This guide is a little bit different to my other Policy Based Forwarding blog post because it uses different virtual routers for both ISP connections. This is quite common to have a distinct default route for both providers. So, in order to route certain traffic, e.g., http/https, to another ISP connection, policy based forwarding is used.

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ScreenOS PBF with VRs featured image

Policy-Based Routing on ScreenOS with different Virtual Routers

I already puslished a blog post concerning policy-based routing on a Juniper firewall within the same virtual router (VR). For some reasons, I was not able to configure PBR correctly when using multiple VRs. Now it works. 😉 So, here are the required steps:

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FortiGate Policy Route featured image

Policy Routing on a FortiGate Firewall

This is a small example on how to configure policy routes (also known as policy-based forwarding or policy-based routing) on a Fortinet firewall, which is really simple at all. Only one single configuration page and you’re done. 😉

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Cisco Router Disable DNS Rewrite NAT

Cisco Router: Disable DNS Rewrite ALG for Static NATs

I am using a Cisco router for my basic ISP connection with a NAT/PAT configuration that translates all client connections to the IPv4 address of the outside interface of the router. Furthermore,  I am translating all my static public IPv4 addresses to private ones through static NAT entries. I basically thought, that only the IPv4 addresses in the mere IPv4 packet header would be translated. However, this was not true since I immediately discovered that public DNS addresses are translated to my private IPv4 addresses, too. This was a bit confusing since I have not explicitly configured an application layer gateway (ALG) on that router.

“Google is my friend” and helped me one more time to find out the appropriate solution: The “no ip nat service alg udp dns” keyword to disable the DNS rewrite. (The synonym from Cisco for DNS rewrite is: DNS doctoring.) Here comes a basic example:

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SSG PBR

Policy-Based Routing (PBR) on a Juniper ScreenOS Firewall

Here comes an example on how to configure policy-based routing (PBR) on a Juniper ScreenOS firewall. The requirement at the customers site was to forward all http and https connections through a cheap but fast DSL Internet connection while the business relevant applications (mail, VoIP, ftp, …) should rely on the reliable ISP connection with static IPv4 addresses. I am showing the five relevant menus to configure PBR on the ScreenOS GUI.

[UPDATE] I later on wrote an article with policy-based routing with two different virtual routers. See it here.[/UPDATE]

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PA PBF

Policy Based Forwarding (PBF) on a Palo Alto Firewall

This is a small example on how to configure policy based forwarding (PBF) on a Palo Alto Networks firewall. The use case was to route all user generated http and https traffic through a cheap ADSL connection while all other business traffic is routed as normal through the better SDSL connection. Since I ran into two problems with this simple scenario, I am showing the solutions here.

[UPDATE] I also wrote an article about policy based forwarding with two different virtual routers on the Palo Alto firewall. See it here.[/UPDATE]

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NAT-NoSecurity

Why NAT has nothing to do with Security!

During my job I am frequently discussing with people why they use NAT or why they believe that NAT adds any security to their networks, mainly some obscurity as NAT (PAT) hides the internal network structure. However, NAT does not add any real security to a network while it breaks almost any good concepts of a structured network design. To emphasize this thesis, here is a discussion:

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