Tag Archives: IPsec

IPv6 through IPv4 VPN Tunnel

IPv6 through IPv4 VPN Tunnel with Palo Alto

The most common transition method for IPv6 (that is: how to enable IPv6 on a network that does not have a native IPv6 connection to the Internet) is a “6in4” tunnel. Other tunneling methods such as Teredo or SixXS are found on different literatures as well. However, another method that is not often explained is to tunnel the IPv6 packets through a normal VPN connection. For example, if the main office has a native IPv6 connection to the Internet as well as VPN connections to its remote offices, it is easy to bring IPv6 subnets to these stations. Here comes an example with two Palo Alto firewalls.

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Android ASA VPN featured image

Cisco ASA Remote Access VPN for Android

The native Android IPsec VPN client supports connections to the Cisco ASA firewall. This even works without the “AnyConnect for Mobile” license on the ASA. If only a basic remote access VPN connection is needed, this fits perfectly. It uses the classical IPsec protocol instead of the newer SSL version. However, the VPN tunnel works anyway.

In this short post I am showing the configuration steps on the ASA and on the Android phone in order to establish a remote access VPN tunnel.

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Android Palo VPN featured image

Palo Alto Remote Access VPN for Android

For a basic remote access VPN connection to a Palo Alto Networks firewall (called “GlobalProtect”), the built-in VPN feature from Android can be used instead of the GlobalProtect app from Palo Alto itself. If the additional features such as HIP profiling are not needed, this variant fits perfectly.

I am showing a few screenshots and logs from the Android smartphone as well as from the Palo Alto to show the differences.

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S2S VPN FortiGate - FritzBox

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN FortiGate <-> FRITZ!Box

Hier kommt ein kurzer Guide wie man ein Site-to-Site VPN zwischen einer FortiGate Firewall und einer AVM FRITZ!Box aufbaut. Anhand von Screenshots zeige ich die Einrichtung der FortiGate, während ich für die FRITZ!Box ein Template der *.cfg Konfigurationsdatei bereitstelle.

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IPv6 through IPv4 VPN Tunnel

IPv6 through IPv4 VPN Tunnel with Juniper SSGs

The most common transition method for IPv6 (that is: how to enable IPv6 on a network that does not have a native IPv6 connection to the Internet) is a “6in4” tunnel. Even other tunneling methods such as Teredo or SixXS are found on different literatures. However, another method that is not often explained is to tunnel the IPv6 packets through a VPN connection. For example, if the main office has a native IPv6 connection to the Internet, as well as VPN connections to its remote offices, it is easy to bring IPv6 subnets to these stations.

Here is how I did it with some Juniper SSG firewalls:

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FRITZ!OS 06.23 IPsec Proposals

FRITZ!OS ab 06.23: IPsec P2 Proposals erweitert

Es geht in eine weitere Runde bei den VPNs von und zur FRITZ!Box. Nach den unglücklichen Änderungen in Version 06.20 hat AVM wieder ein paar Phase 2 Proposals hinzugenommen, die komplett ohne Kompression laufen. Somit ist es wieder möglich, die FRITZ!Box im Aggressive Mode VPN-Verbindungen zu diversen Firewalls aufbauen zu lassen. Komisch nur, dass noch nicht alles ganz wie erwartet funktioniert. Hier kommen meine Testergebnisse.

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Elliptic-Curve

Site-to-Site VPNs with Diffie-Hellman Groups 19 & 20 (Elliptic Curve)

Similar to my test with Diffie-Hellman group 14 shown here I tested a VPN connection with the elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman groups 19 and 20. The considerations why to use these DH groups are listed in the just mentioned post – mainly because of the higher security level they offer. I tested the site-to-site IPsec connections with a Juniper ScreenOS firewall and a Fortinet FortiGate firewall. (Currently, neither the Palo Alto nor the Cisco ASA support these groups.)

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S2S VPN FortiGate - Cisco Router w VTI

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN FortiGate <-> Cisco Router

This blog post shows how to configure a site-to-site IPsec VPN between a FortiGate firewall and a Cisco router. The FortiGate is configured via the GUI – the router via the CLI. I am showing the screenshots/listings as well as a few troubleshooting commands.

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S2S VPN FortiGate - Juniper SSG

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN FortiGate <-> Juniper SSG

Here comes the step-by-step guide for building a site-to-site VPN between a FortiGate and a ScreenOS firewall. Not much to say. I am publishing several screenshots and CLI listings of both firewalls, along with an overview of my laboratory.

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KeePass-GeneratedPasswords

Considerations about IPsec Pre-Shared Keys

Pre-shared keys (PSK) are the most common authentication method for site-to-site IPsec VPN tunnels. So what’s to say about the security of PSKs? What is its role for the network security? How complex should PSKs be? Should they be stored additionally? What happens if an attacker catches my PSKs?

I am listing my best practice steps for generating PSKs.

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Cisco ASA Syslog Server

Grep Commands for Cisco ASA Syslog Messages

In a basic environment with a Cisco ASA firewall I am logging everything to a syslog-ng server. As there aren’t any reporting tools installed, I am using grep to filter the huge amount of syslog messages in order to get the information I want to know. In this blog post I list a few greps for getting the interesting data.

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S2S VPN Juniper ScreenOS - Cisco Router w VTI

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN Juniper ScreenOS <-> Cisco Router w/ VTI

And finally: A route-based VPN between a Juniper ScreenOS SSG firewall and a Cisco router with a virtual tunnel interface (VTI). Both sides with tunnel interfaces and IPv4 addresses. Both sides with a real routing entry in the routing table. Great. 😉

(The VPN between those two parties without a tunnel interface on the Cisco router is documented here. However, use the route-based VPN where you can. It is easier and more flexible. Routing decisions based on the routing table. This is how it should be.)

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S2S VPN Palo Alto - Cisco Router w VTI

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN Palo Alto <-> Cisco Router w/ VTI

One more VPN article. Even one more between a Palo Alto firewall and a Cisco router. But this time I am using a virtual tunnel interface (VTI) on the Cisco router which makes the whole VPN set a “route-based VPN”. That is: Both devices decide their traffic flow merely based on the routing table and not on access-list entries. In my opinion, this is the best way to build VPNs, because there is a single instance (the routing table) on which a network admin must rely on in order to investigate the traffic flow.

Note that I also wrote a blog post about the “policy-based VPN” between a Cisco router and the Palo Alto firewall. This here is mostly the same on the Palo Alto side while some other commands are issued on the Cisco router.

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